GoodTurn Cycles http://goodturncycles.org GoodTurn Cycles is an electric bike shop in Littleton, CO. We offer a retail eBike showroom, rentals, tours, and youth job training. Thu, 15 Nov 2018 22:11:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 http://goodturncycles.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/cropped-mstile-150x150-32x32.png GoodTurn Cycles http://goodturncycles.org 32 32 Kyle’s Six Week eBike Commuting Update http://goodturncycles.org/2018/10/17/kyles-six-week-ebike-commuting-update/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 13:00:38 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=1034 Six weeks of commuting by bike and I can definitely say that my life will never be the same. eBike commuting has been so beneficial to both my mental and physical health that I can’t imagine not continuing to commute by bike. I think the biggest challenge will be learning to overcome the weather issues. The second week of October it has been rainy and in the mid 30’s, not ideal biking conditions. But I have the resolve to continuing biking as much as weather will allow.

If you have been following the blog you might be tracking that my six weeks was up at the end of September. The first week of October I took time off of work for my wedding which was a major success. I bring up my wedding for two reasons. The first is that I am just completely overjoyed by the day and I just want to share it with whoever I can. The second, more pertinent, reason being that I believe my lack of continued weight loss was due to the stressful lifestyle leading up to the day. So while the first half of my commuting experiment resulted in weight loss the second half highlighted the psychological benefits of daily exercise.

Here are some photos of my wedding day:

Here are my up to date riding statistics. If you have any interest in following my rides or seeing my full commute feel free to check out my Strava

To show the full progress of my journey I am including the first 3 weeks of data to this update:

  1. Week 0: 8/12
    1. RHR: 80bpm
    2. Weight: 259 lbs
  2. Week 1: 8/13-8/21
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 142.3
    4. Avg MPH: 19.5
    5. Avg HR: 138 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 254 lbs
  3. Week 2: 8/22-8/28
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 1
    3. Miles: 159.2
    4. Avg MPH: 19.6
    5. Avg HR: 139 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 250 lbs
  4. Week 3: 8/29-9/4
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 138.3
    4. Avg MPH: 20
    5. Avg HR: 144 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 248 lbs
  5. Week 4: 9/5-9/11
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 1
    3. Miles: 176.9
    4. Avg MPH: 19.5
    5. Avg HR: 140.7 bpm
    6. RHR: 78 bpm
    7. Weight: 246 lbs
  6. Week 5: 9/12-9/25
    1. Days Commuting: 5
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 173.6
    4. Avg MPH: 20.5
    5. Avg HR: 136 bpm
    6. RHR: 74 bpm
    7. Weight: 245 lbs
  7. Week 6: 9/26-10/2
    1. Days Commuting: 3
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 98.8
    4. Avg MPH: 19.8
    5. Avg HR: 139
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 246 lbs

The last three weeks of eBike commuting show that during a time in my life of great stress (wedding prep & planning) I wasn’t gaining weight. And while I wish I could say that I was eating a balanced diet, that was definitely not the case. Like many Americans I have a history of succumbing to “comfort foods.” I fully expected to be gaining weight and losing progress during the few weeks before my wedding but instead the opposite happened. Rather than gaining weight during a stressful period, bike commuting allowed me to maintain the weight loss.

Like I mentioned previously the last three weeks of bike commuting illuminated the mental benefits of daily exercise. I started to notice that when I came home from work I was happier and generally in a better mood. The ability to take the stress, problems, and general “weight” of a work day and shed that as I was riding home made a noticeable difference in my attitude. Coming back from my wedding and not being able to ride due the weather has been difficult. Even though commuting by car can be 10-30 minutes shorter it is much “harder” than eBike commuting.

Considering the success I have already had with eBike commuting I am planning on continuing with this commuting experiment. At the beginning I had committed to riding at least 3 days a week. The weather this last week has showed me that I might not be able to ride as many days per week during the winter, so I am committing to ride every day that the weather will allow. As I learn how to dress for cold riding the amount of days I ride will be able to increase. I am hopeful that through eBike commuting I can continue to improve my health, and with the stress of wedding planning being over continue to lose weight.

As I learn more, I will continue to share my experience. I will also continue to put out health updates for 1 month intervals. Thanks for reading and supporting my journey to better health through eBike commuting!

Kyle

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eBike Commuting In Denver http://goodturncycles.org/2018/10/03/ebike-commuting-in-denver/ Wed, 03 Oct 2018 15:00:08 +0000 https://goodturncycles.org/?p=1020 When I started this eBike commuting journey I really had no idea what it was like to commute on a bike regularly.  I had heard the other guys in the shop talk about what it was like but I didn’t have any hands on experience. Being fresh to the bike commuting community I had many questions surrounding what it would be like. How tired was I going to be once I got to work? Would I be able to sit in the saddle (bike seat) for 30 miles each time I rode to work? I know I see cyclists decked out in spandex, what should I be wearing? How do I get biking directions? These were some of the questions I had surrounding bike commuting and if anyone else is interested in starting to commute by bike, specifically eBike, you might have some of these questions too. So I wanted to give a summary of my experience of what it’s like to commute by bike and hopefully pass along some tips that will be helpful for those who are starting to commute by eBike.

Number 1: You will be out in the elements.

In a strange way the biggest thing I didn’t think about is that by biking you will be outside, which means there will be bugs and smells… My first time riding home from work I was completely unprepared for the amount of gnats that come out in the evening and hang around the path. Most of my commute, and many bike trails in the Denver metro area, follow rivers and creeks which means that many bugs and gnats are flying around at dusk. I was getting pelted in the face by bugs and had a hard time seeing and breathing. So the first thing I would recommend is having a face cover and appropriate eyewear so that you don’t get obliterated by bugs as your trying to have a fun time riding. For night riding I was able to pick up a pair of safety glasses to protect from bugs. Another product I have enjoyed are these face masks. Also, be prepared that riding will not always smell the best as you’re traversing the city. One spot that is always a challenge is along the south platte before downtown Littleton where there is a waste management plant, which often has a tendency to smell quite unpleasant. To keep riding it’s important to be prepared for what the experience can be like, and though there are some unpleasantries, I often find myself enjoying the wind, beautiful views and time to just think as I ride along.

Number 2: If it starts to hurt, you need to make a change.

One thing that seems to often get overlooked in the eBike world is making sure that your bike is fit well to you. It’s something I didn’t really consider too much until the second week riding when I felt a sharp pain in my knee that made it hard to keep going and get into work. By talking with the guys at the shop and doing some internet searching i learned that my foot positioning on the pedals and how close my seat was to the handlebars was causing the pain. A couple adjustments and I was back to riding without pain. It taught me that listening to your body while riding is very important. If I had continued to ride without making adjustments it’s possible that I could have injured myself in a way that would have put me out of commission. As you continue to commute by bike, make sure that you pay close attention to your body, instead of maintaining and servicing a vehicle motor your now maintaining and servicing yourself in order to keep riding.

Click here (https://youtu.be/1VYhyppWTDc) for a basic idea of how to set your initial bike fit.

Number 3: Wear what’s comfortable for you.

The cycling world is vast and there are a lot of different opinions on what you should wear in order to optimize riding ability and performance. The major article of clothing being cycling shorts with extra padding (chamois). I have personally found that the specific clothing items you can purchase have not been necessary for me. I’m the type of person that likes simplicity, I don’t want to have to bring extra clothes or change when I get to work if I don’t have to. One benefit of commuting on an eBike is that it seems to make riding in regular attire easier, but if you are starting your own commuting journey and are discovering that you have issues with saddle sores, then wear something with some extra padding. I can get away with wearing jeans on my rides, but our shop manager Adam needs to wear cycling shorts with a chamois to stay in the saddle longer. I would say it’s all preference, but don’t feel like you have to “have the right clothes” to start biking. Wear what you have and adjust if necessary.

Number 4: Google Maps is a great place to start for biking directions.

If you’re new to biking then you probably didn’t even realize that Google Maps has a bike directions feature. It is just about the only true bike direction service that I know of besides just looking at a map and trying to plan routes. Using the bike directions that Google provides is a great start but don’t feel like you need to follow them exactly. Many of the routes provided follow standard biking lanes, so while they are great for the biking trails, the system can sometimes take you on busy streets that technically have a bike lane but aren’t the best for riding. It also doesn’t necessarily tell you if there are any issues with a specific route. The first day I was biking into work I ran into some construction on the bike path that forced me onto surface streets. Luckily I was able to follow some detour signs to until I could get back onto the path. I have to admit that when I saw that I was going to be forced of the route I thought I was taking I panicked just a little. It taught me early on that just like driving, sometimes the routes we plan don’t work out and adjustments are necessary. So don’t be afraid to stray from the trail and see if maybe there is a better or maybe just more enjoyable way to get where you’re going.

For a bit more information on how to use Google Maps Biking feature click here (Google Bike Map Instructions).

Here is a screen shot of Google’s map system showing biking routes around our shop.

I am still very new to bike commuting, but I can’t imagine going back to commuting by car everyday. I have no doubts that my bike commuting journey will continue, and as it does I will have to navigate new challenges, colder weather, night riding, and more routine bicycle maintenance are the three that first come to mind. If your new to commuting and have any questions or want to know more about my eBike commuting journey feel free to shoot me an email to kyle@goodturncycles.org.

Thanks for reading! Make sure you stay tuned for my sixth week riding health update.

Kyle

 

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eBike Commuting Health Effects http://goodturncycles.org/2018/09/10/ebike-commuting-health-effects/ Mon, 10 Sep 2018 14:40:02 +0000 https://goodturncycles.org/?p=1016 There were many different reasons that I wanted to start commuting to work by bike instead of with my car. Reducing my carbon footprint, working at a bike shop and wanting to test out our bikes, not wanting to sit in forty minutes of Denver traffic, but the reason that motivated me the most and pushed me over into the bike commuting world was my health. Being recently engaged I started to think about the kind of life i was living and the kind of life I wanted to have with my Wife to be. One thing I knew I wanted was to be healthy, to live without fear of various overweight health related issues, and to be able to be more than capable, physically, of playing and interacting with my future kids.

My soon to be wife

A visit to the doctor for a physical revealed news that I was dreading and yet expecting. Sure, I am relatively healthy now and not having any major issues, but if i didn’t start to lose weight I am on a trajectory for heart, blood and joint problems. When I went to the doctor I weighed in at 264 lbs, the heaviest I had ever been. The doctor told me that I should theoretically weigh under two hundred pounds. I wasn’t sure if I weighed under 200 since before high school. So I knew that to save my knees and prepare for my future I had no choice but to make a change.

At the time I was living fairly close to the bike shop and so I decided to pull out the old steel mountain bike I had purchased used almost a year previously and start biking to work. That doctors visit was in May, the next couple months I think I rode into work by bike twice, maybe four times tops. While I desired to ride to work there were obstacles that I just couldn’t overcome. It was 7 miles each way, which was doable but only barely with the couple hills I had to climb. I learned that one way 7-10 miles was my distance limit before I was exhausted. Not only was I physically struggling with the ride but I had a hard time mentally. Riding on roads with cars, and bike paths with hardcore road-cyclists just made me feel even slower than I already did. Not only was I battling a physical struggle to bike more than a few miles, I was battling a mental struggle as well. I desired so greatly to get on my bike and cruise into work while getting exercise, but riding beat me down and it would take a couple weeks before I was ready to try again.

Fast forward to August, two months before my wedding. I had recently moved into a new apartment that was right next to the Lakewood Gulch bike path, so my inspiration to ride into work peaked once again. I knew I was farther but I was right next to the path, I figured it wouldn’t be too far of a ride. Checking the route I saw that it was 17 miles …one way… but I was determined to get into work by bike and so I came up with an idea, what if I rode an electric bike?

There was a study that we had come across, at the shop, testing to see if commuting on an eBike would still provide health benefits. If you want to read that study you can find it here. To summarize, the study found that the health of the participants was beginning to increase and they were riding the bikes more than was even required of them. I knew I that I didn’t have the income to buy a bike while trying to pay for a wedding. So what if I could be a type of study within GoodTurn. I would commit to riding on an eBike for 6 weeks at least 3 days a week. This would allow me to test out the claims that riding an eBike still improved health while being able to finally bike to work. We worked out that in order to measure my own health we would record two things, first my weight and second my resting heart rate as these are both common indicators of overall health.

So my journey commuting on an eBike began. Before I started I needed to measure my weight and RHR(resting heart rate). On August 12th I weighed in at 259 lbs, and thanks to the Fitbit Blaze that I had been wearing for a couple months I knew that my RHR was at 80bpm. With my baseline stats and an eBike to ride, my commuting experiment began. Below are my mid journey health statistics (the weight measurement is taken from the last day of the week that I rode):

  1. Week 0: 8/12
    1. RHR: 80bpm
    2. Weight: 259 lbs
  2. Week 1: 8/13-8/21
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 142.3
    4. Avg MPH: 19.5
    5. Avg HR: 138 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 254 lbs
  3. Week 2: 8/22-8/28
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 1
    3. Miles: 159.2
    4. Avg MPH: 19.6
    5. Avg HR: 139 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 250 lbs
  4. Week 3: 8/29-9/4
    1. Days Commuting: 4
    2. Fun Rides: 0
    3. Miles: 138.3
    4. Avg MPH: 20
    5. Avg HR: 144 bpm
    6. RHR: 76 bpm
    7. Weight: 248 lbs

If I had to give a summary of this information it would be that commuting on an eBike definitely still has health benefits. And if anyone wants to say that an eBike is cheating i would challenge them to look at my heart rate while riding an eBike compared to a traditional bike. I took a look at my average heart rate on a group of six rides that i did on a traditional bike and my average HR came out to 138 bpm. This shows that while riding an eBike (at least a Stromer) I am getting the same level of physical activity as a regular bike only I can go twice as far at a greater constant rate of speed than I am capable on my own.

I am about halfway through my six week journey and so far it has been greatly beneficial to my health, not only physical but mental. As the data shows I have lost 11 pounds in the last 3 weeks and my RHR has seemed to drop 4 bpm. Beside these starting health gains I have also noticed a difference in my own mental state. I have been more joyful the last couple weeks and it’s something I could only attribute to biking a couple hours a few days a week. An eBike is providing me a better commute to work, better physical and mental health, a way to reduce my carbon footprint, and most importantly encouragement that I can achieve my health goals.

I will keep blogging about my commuting experience as well! So if you want to just know more about commuting on an eBike keep an eye out!

Thanks for reading! 

Kyle

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Jobs180 Partnership with Project ReCycle http://goodturncycles.org/2018/07/11/jobs180-partnership-with-project-recycle/ Wed, 11 Jul 2018 15:00:08 +0000 https://goodturncycles.org/?p=956 A key component of our bicycle mechanic apprenticeship at GoodTurn Cycles is our ability to provide practice opportunities. Each apprentice in our program receives multiple chances to practice bike repair skills on various kinds of bikes.

We couldn’t provide this opportunity without our valuable partnership with an organization called Project ReCycle.

A nonprofit based in Douglas County, Colorado, Project ReCycle runs various programs that revolve around providing bicycles to young people who display academic and personal growth. Project ReCycle collects and refurbishes thousands of bicycles each year, then works with schools and organizations — both locally and internationally — to get quality bikes into the hands of students who earn them as a reward for hard work in school.

Below is a picture of a bike give away event set up. 

For the past year, Project ReCycle has provided our apprentices with between five to seven donated bikes per week. Our apprentices then perform repairs and tune up these bikes, and give them back to the folks at Project ReCycle who in turn prepare them for excited students. It’s a great win-win situation.

Here is another photo of kids who have received bikes from them. 

Recently, some of our apprentices had the opportunity to participate in a Project ReCycle bike distribution event. On May 17th, 75 students at Federal Heights Elementary School received bicycles due to their exemplary grades and attendance. Three of our apprentices — James, Elnaz, and Tyler — were on hand to ensure that seats were adjusted to the correct height and happy third graders were riding safely and in style.

If you have a bike you’d like to donate or want to get more involved as a volunteer with a great organization, we highly recommend Project ReCycle. Also, check them out on the Project ReCycle Facebook page.

 

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Mobility Done Differently at GoodTurn Cycles http://goodturncycles.org/2018/06/30/mobility-done-differently-at-goodturn-cycles/ Sat, 30 Jun 2018 20:02:23 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=894 Recall for a moment riding a bike for a first time: you’re free, out of the sights of your parents, speeding down the road with your friends and now, with your new machine, your world just got a lot bigger. You’re now independent, maybe you’ll get a job, make a new friend or run errands for your parents. This increase in mobility isn’t only reserved for the younger generation though, and at GoodTurn Cycles, an electric bike shop in Littleton, CO, (https://goodturncycles.org/) we exist to increase mobility for all. Specifically, we help increase physical mobility for our bike customers and professional mobility for our apprentices!

Enter, the eBike. eBikes, short for Electronic Bikes, are traditional bicycles outfitted with an electric motor, a battery and a controller to combine the two. They work through Pedal Assist, providing the rider additional power as the rider is pedaling, or through a throttle, allowing the rider to get motor power without pedaling (https://youtu.be/5VKMxd1FFDc). eBikes can take the “bite” out of cycling that can keep people off two wheels. That “bite” can come from steep hills, body ailments and health conditions or long days in the saddle. These miraculous machines are bringing the youthful joy of riding a bike back to those who’d been sidelined for whatever reason. We see customers all the time regain their two-wheeled mobility, resulting in more family ride time, less time in their automobiles and ultimately more time exercising!

 

Not only are we promoting mobility through cycling at GoodTurn, but professional mobility as well. As a nonprofit social enterprise, our mission is to provide young people ages 16-24 with transferable job experience and professional skills that act as a springboard for them to find meaningful careers. Our apprentices participate in a 3-month, bicycle mechanic curriculum diving into the specifics of advanced bicycle maintenance. Supplementing the technical portion of the curriculum is an employability regimen that readies our apprentices with soft skills for whatever career path they take. Through the continued support of our donors and customersof GoodTurn Cycles, we are able to provide our apprentices the same first-bike-liberation in their professional careers (https://goodturncycles.org/apprenticeship-program/).

At GoodTurn Cycles, a nonprofit eBike shop In Littleton, CO, we do mobility differently. Through our eBike selection, we are helping customers regain their physical mobility. They’re getting back on the road, riding further, faster and without any of the “bite.” With our job training program we are providing our apprentices with a new sense of professional mobility. By gaining the transferrable, technical and soft skills needed in the professional world, they’re equipped to pursue the career paths of their choice. We are much more than a typical bike shop, and I invite you to come by to see all the good we’re doing!

Adam Taylor

Shop Manager

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How We Give Back: Jobs180 At GoodTurn http://goodturncycles.org/2018/06/13/how-we-give-back-jobs180-at-goodturn/ Wed, 13 Jun 2018 15:00:38 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=837 At Good Turn we have seen that there is a disconnect with jobs that should be entry level but still require experience.

Jobs180, a nonprofit dedicated to providing on-the-job training and life skills, is a program which allows us to combat that issue by providing work experience to teens who may not have opportunities elsewhere. Our shop is focused on more than just trying to sell a few bikes. We bring in local teens and teach them some job practices that will give them a helping hand as they enter the workforce. Collaboration, problem solving, and financial planning are just a few things our apprentices are able to learn while they help out in the shop. We like to think it’s a pretty fun environment to learn practical skills. We are partnered with Project Recycle, a nonprofit that provides kids with free bicycles, who provides us with donated bikes that we use to train our apprentices on how to maintain and repair bicycles.

Studies have shown that teens need at least 5 adults in their lives to come alongside them and help them grow to be prepared in life. Our employees are able to do just that as they work side by side with the teens not only fixing bikes but talking about life and building relationships with one another. At Good Turn we believe in the power of the local community to affect change in the lives of the youth and we feel our apprenticeship program is the best way to invest in and give back to the community we are a part of. Do you have an old bike that could be used to help train our apprentices? Come stop by the shop today and help us continue to invest in the community!

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Why We Provide Rentals http://goodturncycles.org/2018/05/30/why-we-provide-rentals/ Wed, 30 May 2018 15:00:40 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=835 At GoodTurn we find that many people who stop into the shop have never experienced what it is like to ride an electric bicycle. Our desire is to allow everyone the opportunity to ride an ebike and our rental program provides for that desire. We think that a ride on one of our bikes can be a life changing experience even if it is just a short two hour ride around some beautiful scenery. One of the best comments that we received from one of our rental customers was that they felt like a kid riding a bike. No fear about going up a hill and a ride that feels like you constantly have the wind at your back. Thats the kind of ride an electric bike can provide and we believe everyone deserves to have that experience whether or not that have the capability to purchase one of our bikes.

Our rental program begins at $30 for a two hour rental and if you are out riding then you can keep the ride going for an additional $10 per hour. Renting electric bikes is a great activity for family or friends that are visiting from out of town who might not be used to the challenge of the elevation of Denver. Its also a fun and carefree way to enjoy a beautiful weekend in the Denver area.

Stop by the shop today and give our rentals a try!

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The Economics Of An eBike http://goodturncycles.org/2018/05/16/the-economics-of-an-ebike/ Wed, 16 May 2018 15:00:53 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=832 Do you ever wish you could get out of the traffic on your commute to work and save money?

The yearly cost of operating an electric bike as a main commuter vehicle is significantly less than operating a car. Lets calculate the cost based on a commute of eight miles. Many cars today get an average of around 23.6 miles per gallon. The cost of a gallon of gas today is around $2.50. That means that many cars cost roughly 10 cents per mile to operate. That means commuting 8 miles to and from work costs about one dollar and 6 cents per day. This might not seem like too great a cost but if you work 5 days a week for 11 months then the cost of commuting for a year is $384. Not including the cost of registration, insurance and any repairs.

The cost of operating an electric bike is significantly less. Lets use the vintage electric cafe as a comparison. The cafe has a 699 watt-hour battery which costs only 7 cents to charge based on the kilowatt cost average of 11 cents. With that charged up battery the bike can travel at least 20 miles riding at the top speed of 28mph. That means based on the lowest distance possible it would only cost 6 cents per day to commute to work using the vintage. Per year the bike would cost $14 to operate as a primary commute transportation method. This means that it is 25 times less expensive to use an electric bike as a form of commuter transportation than a car. Also traveling at 28mph on roads or bike paths without traffic the time it takes to commute could easily remain the same.

Get more exercise, remove stress, save money and help the environment. These are all benefits from using an ebike to commute to work.

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Why Are eBikes So Expensive? http://goodturncycles.org/2018/05/02/why-are-ebikes-so-expensive/ Wed, 02 May 2018 15:00:23 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=828 A quick google search for e-bikes reveals bikes priced anywhere from $300 to $10,000. So why are some electric bikes more expensive than others?

Without a doubt, the costliest single item on an electric bike is the battery. Premium lithium ion batteries on e-bikes start at around $500 and go up to more than a $1000. Established electric bike manufacturers put great resources toward the battery of the e-bike because, in many ways, it’s the heart of the bike. The batter determines how much range of pedal assist you’ll get from the bike as well as how fast you’ll be able to go. A more expensive battery has great capacity to take you further distances. Also, a stronger and more expensive battery has a longer lifespan. Most top-tier manufacturers estimate battery life around 1000 cycles, with a full depletion and full recharge being one cycle.

Furthermore, manufacturers invest money and technology into the safety of the battery. You may have heard of instances when lithium-ion batteries on cell phones caught fire in recent years. Reputable electric bike manufactures install safety features on their e-bikes batteries to ensure that won’t happen.

Next let’s consider the price of components on a quality traditional bike. Walk into any bike shop looking to buy a new bike and you can expect to spend anywhere from $400 to $5000 or more. A more expensive price tag usually means better quality components such as brakes, gears, and wheels that will provide better performance and stand the test of time. The same is true for electric bikes: outside the battery and motor, electric bikes function exactly like traditional bikes, and higher-end components carry a higher price tag and, usually, a better and more reliable ride.

Not only does the price include more reliability and peace of mind, often a higher-priced bike can include a better warranty and strong relationship with a local shop. Purchasing a low cost bike online doesn’t allow for a consumer to interact with a shop that has professional technicians who can provide service to a bike for its lifetime.

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Are Electric Bikes Even Legal? Regulations For eBikes http://goodturncycles.org/2018/04/18/are-electric-bikes-even-legal-regulations-for-ebikes/ Wed, 18 Apr 2018 15:00:23 +0000 http://goodturncycles.org/?p=825 Are electric bikes allowed everywhere that traditional bikes are allowed? Are they even legal? What are some of the laws that govern e-bikes?

Electric Bikes have the same rules and regulations as standard bicycles and are not subject to registration, licensing, or insurance requirement that apply to motor vehicles. In August of 2017, Colorado passed legislation around ebikes that many states are now starting to adopt. The law creates three different classes for electric bikes:

  • Class 1 is a Bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the e-bike reaches 20 mph.
  • Class 2 is a Bicycle equipped with a throttle-actuated motor, and that ceases to provide assistance when the e-bike reaches 20 mph
  • Class 3 is a Bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the e-bike reaches 28 mph.

According to Colorado state law class 1 and 2 bicycles are allowed on bike and pedestrian paths where standard bikes are already allowed. However local authorities are allowed to prohibit e-bikes on trails within their jurisdiction. Class 3 bikes are prohibited on bike paths and may only be ridden on the road, or on designated bike lanes on the road. E-bikes are allowed in all 42 Colorado state parks where bikes are already permitted. On Federal lands e-bikes are considered motorized vehicles and have access to motorized trails. This makes a complicated law for those looking to do e-mountain biking. At GoodTurn Cycles, we always recommend checking with the forest service before taking an e-bike on mountain trails.

Something else to be aware of are the restrictions for who can operate class three bikes. According to Colorado state you must be at least 16 to operate a class 3 bike and a helmet is required if you are under 18 years old.

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